Resorts

A resort provides recreation and entertainment and is typically visited for holidays and vacations. A large variation of resorts is available, ranging from basic vacation parks to luxury-, and all-inclusive resorts. A common denominator of all resorts is that they attempt to cater for all or most of a vacationer’s wants; including food, beverages, lodging, sports, entertainment and shopping.

Originally resorts were predominantly found near the coast (or a railroad), but with the introduction of the automobile more remotely located resorts were realized. Resorts appeared in scenic places, far away from the hectic life of cities. To maintain the scenic character of the resort, protect the local nature and to ensure a (noise and air) pollution free and tranquil environment for the guests, most resort are no longer allowing automobiles to access their premises – facilitating remote parking near the resort entrance.

Besides a better guest experience, another advantage from restricting car-access to the resort is that the space reserved for parking is minimized – both at the different resort facilities and at the villas/bungalows. The need for transportation within the resort remains and, especially when the resort is set-up more spaciously, a transportation system is desired. The transit system will have to match the personal character and quality of the car (privacy, available at any time), while avoiding its’ space consumption (parking places). Shared usage of small, automated vehicles is a suited alternative for resorts.

Resort towns (communities where tourism is a primary component of the local culture and economy) typically feature multiple hotels and offer a similar variation in activities as a resort. The distinction is that these activities are offered by different, competing companies. Most ski-resorts are resort towns, but also popular destinations as Sharm El Sheikh (Egypt), Porto Seguro (Brazil) and Phuket and Trang (Thailand). Typically the transit demand in these towns will be more group oriented. Automation of the local transit system allows for a higher service level (at lower operational costs).

Several resort towns are now focusing on ‘soft mobility’ – environmentally friendly travel by means of public transport, bicycle or foot. The village of Werfenweng (Austria) is well known for its initiatives in this perspective. People movers fit extremely well within this concept.

PRT

Car-free resorts and resort towns warrant their scenic character and ensure a better guest experience – also contributing to protect the local nature and ensuring a (noise and air) pollution free and tranquil environment. As the need for transportation remains, and space is a valuable commodity, a system allowing for shared usage of small automated vehicles (PRT) is well suited as a solution.

The PRT system offers high quality transportation matching the personal character and quality of the car (privacy and available at any time). At the same time it avoids its’ space consumption, by eliminating the need to create parking spaces both at the different resort facilities and at the villas/bungalows. The Personal Rapid Transit system interconnects all facilities and provides guests with direct connections.

The electronic guidance allows for the system to be implemented at grade, minimizing the visual intrusion and ensuring the character of the resort remains undisturbed. The small foot print ensures it is easily integrated in the spatial planning. Capital costs are kept minimal as the system only requires a basic and simple infrastructure. Optionally the routing of the PRT system could also connect to other nearby locations; a town, other resorts, beaches and/or activity centers.

GRT

Resort towns feature large visitor numbers and an even bigger number of passenger movements. Thankfully, many tourists either do not have a car or do not want to use their car for in-town trips. Otherwise 24hr. congestion, seriously affecting the visiting experience and the scenic character, would be guaranteed. The mobility needs remain, however.

The ParkShuttle GRT system can be installed as a local area transit system for in-town trips, connecting the main hotel locations with popular attractions and facilities. As the system features a high travel frequency and can carry 20 passengers per vehicle, the system can be upgraded to a considerable hourly capacity. The unit size of the vehicles, accomodating 12 seated passengers, is well suited for the group travel within the resort towns.

Some resort towns, including the ones focusing on the concept of ‘soft mobility’, feature a car-free or car-accesibility reduced environment. These towns are only accesible by slow traffic (bikes and pedestrians) and public transit. To facilitate car-accesibility large parking facilities are created, out of sight, at the outskirts of town. The public transit system connects the facilities in town to the parking. The ParkShuttle is an ideal feeder system to realize this connection.

The electronic guidance allows for the system to be implemented at grade, minimizing the visual intrusion and ensuring the character of the resort towns remains undisturbed. Capital costs are kept minimal as the system only requires a basic and simple infrastructure.

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