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Innovation Expo

Innovation ExpoDennis Mica, Business Development Manager

The most advanced autonomous vehicle, to be introduced at Rivium business park next year, will be at the Innovation Expo.

3rd gen Autonomous Shuttle

The Innovation Expo 2018 (October 4) is open to visitors from 09.00 a.m. until 08.00 p.m. The bustling expo hall (closing at 06.00 p.m.) features a host of interesting and amazing innovations. In addition, you may participate in in-depth substantive sessions. 2getthere will be exhibiting as well: for more information please visit https://innovationexpo2018.nl/en/programma/2getthere/.

Just like at Intertraffic, 2getthere will have its 3rd generation vehicle on display. The vehicles is the most advanced in the market and is in a class of its own in terms of build quality. This is a direct result of the long life requirement set for the vehicle, while being developed for the heavy requirements of public transit use. Join us at the RDM campus to see for yourself that self driving vehicles are mature enough to provide operations on a daily basis.

Innovation Expo

Taking innovations further, realising breakthroughs, and thus contributing to the social challenges we are facing in our country and in the world. That is the ambition of the Innovation Expo 2018 (IE2018) in Rotterdam. On 4 October 2018, the RDM Submarine Wharf in Rotterdam South will be transformed into one big Living Lab. A while ago, under the flag of the National Programme Rotterdam South, we started to work on improving education, employment, safety, and living conditions in this area. Here, in these remarkable, dynamic surroundings, participants in the IE2018 will experience the latest trends and innovations that help to keep our country safe, liveable, and accessible.

The IE2018 is a sample sheet of the most recent and high-profile developments that the Netherlands has to offer. We will present Dutch solutions to the major social challenges in the fields of the circular economy, energy, water, mobility, the built-up environment, health, and food, as well as the required enabling technologies.

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Connexxion selected to operate Rivium 3.0

connexxion awarded operationsBram Moelker, operator Connexxion

“This is great news. We look forward to continuing to operate the system for the next 15 years.”

Connexxion awarded operations

In the coming years, 2getthere’s new GRT vehicles will transform the ParkShuttle in Capelle aan den IJssel into the world’s first autonomous system operating on public roads without featuring a safety driver or steward on board. To enable this the Metropolitan region Rotterdam The Hague (MRDH) has awarded to concession to operate the ParkShuttle from 2018 through 2033 to public transit operating company Connexion, part of Transdev. When the first driverless vehicles hit the public roads in 2020, it is a world first established by the metropolitan region. Lennart Harpe, responsible for public transit development at MRDH: ‘This concession underlines MRDH’s ambition to further increase regional mobility and to support the Roadmap NextEconomy by becoming an internationally leading research- and application area for autonomous transit for the last mile.’

The ParkShuttle system between subway station Kralingse Zoom in Rotterdam and business park Rivium in Capelle aan den IJssel is the first urban autonomous transit system in the Netherlands and in operation since 1999. Over the years over 6 million passengers have used the system.

>20% increase in daily usage

The current system will be replaced with 6 GRT (Group Rapid Transit) vehicles manufactured by 2getthere, which provide a capacity of approximately 500 passengers per hour per direction. The service will commence on the current trajectory by the summer of 2019. The extension over public roads towards the new to be established stop of the Waterbus will commence in 2020.

The renewal and extension of the ParkShuttle system has been the ambition of the city of Capelle aan den IJssel for a while. The system carries over 2,200 passengers on a daily basis. According to alderman Dick van Sluis this number will increase significantly: ‘With the extension in 2020 the system in the unique link between the Waterbus and the subway network of Rotterdam. We expect the number of daily passengers to increase with 20% as a result.’

MRDH contributes 600,000 Euro per year to the operations of the system. The city of Capelle aan den IJssel and De Verkeersonderming contributed financially to the delivery of the system.

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2getthere establishes an office in Silicon Valley

office-2getthere-silicon-valleyCarel van Helsdingen, Chief Executive Officer, 2getthere

“We are hardly some inexperienced startup.”

Silicon Valley

Dutch technology company 2getthere, which specializes in the development of automated vehicles, is set to open a new office in Silicon Valley in January 2017. From its new base in the world’s leading technology hub, the Utrecht-based company intends to conquer the third major international market for automated transit solutions, following Asia (Singapore) and the Middle East (Dubai). 2getthere is the leading company worldwide with many years of experience in developing and operating automated, driverless vehicles that transport thousands of passengers a day. The company – which currently employs around 50 developers, IT specialists and engineers – estimates it will be able to sell a minimum of three to five of these types of solutions in the US annually within the next several years, accounting for a total of $150 million to $300 million in new orders.

Although 2getthere delivered its first automated transit system to Amsterdam Airport Schiphol as early as 1997, the company remains a relatively unknown player in the Dutch manufacturing industry. Its core markets are located in Asia and the Middle East, where its mobility solutions (driverless taxis and minibuses) have been part of the urban infrastructure for some time. The opening of the new San Francisco office is part of the company’s strategy to break into the high-potential US market.

The company states that its decision to set up a base in the heart of high-tech hub Silicon Valley was prompted not only by the fact that all leading developers of automated transit systems and the related technologies are based there, but also by the immense market potential to be found in the area.
2getthere CEO Carel van Helsdingen: ‘The rapid growth of sprawling corporate campuses is particularly exciting to us in terms of the opportunities it offers. There’s the Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington, for example, the Tesla manufacturing facility in Nevada, and the Apple and Cisco campuses in California. Automated mobility solutions are the most obvious alternative for business parks on that scale.’

Having what it takes

2getthere currently has more experience in developing automated vehicles than any other company worldwide. The various applications it develops are used to transport around 80,000 passengers a month who collectively travel more than 100,000 kilometers. Van Helsdingen feels his company has got what it takes to achieve success in this market: ‘We are hardly some inexperienced startup – we specialize in developing vehicle software, traffic control systems, dispatch software (that is, the coordinating software used to manage a fleet) and in integrating the software for various types of sensors. We are currently in talks with several potential partners in Silicon Valley to see where we might be able to find synergies. That process will undoubtedly be boosted by the fact that we will now actually be physically based there as well,’ Van Helsdingen said.

COO Robbert Lohmann pointed out that 2getthere has a unique edge when it comes to the real-world implementation of these systems. ‘There may be a large number of pilot projects around, but in order to develop a 100% safe system with an uptime rate of 99.8%, like the one we built in Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, you also need to have an in-depth understanding of planning aspects and traffic flows. As far as I know, we are the only company worldwide that combines all those different types of knowledge and expertise.’

Priority

Entering the US market marks a new stage in the evolution of the fast-growing company, which will be moving into new premises in Utrecht in the coming year, including its own test courses. The company is currently involved in more than a dozen scheduled projects across the US, including a project in Jacksonville, Florida and one in Greenville, South Carolina. Lohmann: “You don’t break into this market overnight – it can take up to several years for a project to be completed. But having realized successful applications already, we are often automatically shortlisted for public and private tenders.”
2getthere has already teamed up with the US-based company Oceaneering, working on various projects. The company states that finding strong partners is a priority when it comes to reducing the time needed to develop the market for its products. Van Helsdingen: ‘We provide mobility solutions but remain the actual owner of the system. That means we’re looking for companies undaunted by the idea of partnering with us for a period of 10 or even 20 years, as is the case with United Technical Services in the United Arab Emirates and SMRT in Singapore. Both these companies are currently shareholders in 2getthere. We are confident we will be able to find similar partners in Silicon Valley relatively quickly.’

Smart cities

2getthere also believes there is great commercial potential in the development of transit systems for large theme parks and medium-sized airports (1.5 million+ passengers a year). Lohmann believes orders to the tune of 50 to 100 million dollars a year would not be unrealistic. ‘If we get the opportunity to partner with one of the major technology companies, that figure could turn out to be even higher.’
For the longer term, Lohmann also has high expectations of the development of what are known as ‘smart cities’ – cities investing in integrating data available locally in order to improve quality of life. ‘Automated transit is absolutely one of the key elements in that process, and that includes Automated People Mover Systems, Automated Transit Networks and Shared Autonomous Vehicles. The city of Columbus, Ohio is currently in the process of building such a system, and that’s exactly the type of project in which our company would like to get involved and share its expertise.’

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Amsterdam Driverless Vehicles

driverless-vehicles-amsterdam-lelylaanRobbert Lohmann, Chief Operations Officer, 2getthere

[quote]“Sharing of transit is crucial to improve the sustainability and liveability of a city.”[/quote]
 

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The Team

Commissioned by The Royal Institute of Dutch Architects (BNA), a multidisciplinary team consisting of UNStudio (architects/urban designers), Goudappel Coffeng (mobility consultants), Geophy (data specialists) and 2getthere (innovative mobility systems developers) has collaborated on a study that examines the future potential of the integration of infrastructure and city development around the area of Amsterdam’s A10 ring road and the Lelylaan area. Part of this are the Amsterdam Driverless Vehicles.

The Study

Currently the A10 ring road in Amsterdam forms a barrier that inhibits the connection between the inner and outer parts of the city and renders its immediate surroundings both uninhabitable and unused. As population growth has propelled development further outward from the city center and along the ring road, an opportunity was identified to integrate the highway and the city in a way that generates new forms of living and improves mobility for future inhabitants.

The result of the study formulates solutions that reconcile the disparate nature of the highway and the city through the injection of new programs and amenities, alongside improved accessibility, to make the A10 and its surrounding neighborhoods a desirable destination with a positive presence in the city.

Envisioning how future mobility and urban development can be successfully integrated requires a new toolbox with which the building blocks of the city of tomorrow can be built. The goal of the proposal is twofold: a proposition for a new multimodal transport hub located on the intersection between Cornelis Lelyaan and the A10, and new urban developments on both sides of the A10 that link the adjacent neighborhoods and create a unique new address in Amsterdam.
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Amsterdam Driverless Vehicles

The Hub, a new mixed-use destination, offers a smooth mobility connection that will allow users to transition between private cars and public transport; from cars which run on petrol to electric mobility; from driving to walking and cycling. Offering parking, restaurants and retail, the Hub also includes a stop for the CityPods, a new alternative to mass-public transport. 2getthere’s Amsterdam Driverless Vehicles provide mobility to the city center of Amsterdam in approximately 10 minutes. Through a redesign of the spatial planning, the system can operate using the current roads. The Hub also features a charging station for electric mobility and, through the use of locally stored car batteries, will function as an energy supply center in peak hours for the surrounding neighborhoods.

‘Sharing of transit is crucial to improve the sustainability and liveability of a city. Shared use, electrification and autonomous operation are converging trends, with the benefits of one becoming synonymous with the others. Shared transit, or public transit if you will, is a requirement to reduce the number of vehicles in an area.’, states Robbert Lohmann, COO 2getthere. In the case of the Amsterdam Lelylaan, the system can transport 1000 persons per hour per direction, with one vehicle departing approximately every 75 seconds.

Conclusions

In addition to the development of the Hub and the connecting transit systems, the study has also considered the main highway A10, introducing flexibility in the flexibility in the direction of travel of the lanes. This also allows to use the existing space smarter depending on the time of day. By introducing housing and offices close to the ring, the A10 will no longer be a barrier between the city center and its suburbs. The Hub is in the middle of all this, with all modalities converging and allowing for easy transfers, amongst other to the Amsterdam driverless vehicles of 2getthere.

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2getthere hosts Insights in driverless transit ahead of Podcar conference

Carel van Helsdingen, Chief Executive Officer, 2getthere

[quote]“The lessons learned from the application at business park Rivium are the basis for the Masdar application and the 3rd generation GRT vehicle.”[/quote]

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Morning Program

The development of self driving vehicles is growing tremendously. What is the impact of automated vehicles in public transport? How can we prepare the city for these self driving vehicles and specifically for public transport? What do you need to know to properly advice your customers which laws, standards and regulations to apply?

Preceeding InnoTrans in Berlin and PodcarCity in Antwerp, we would like to invite you to ‘Insights in driverless transit’ on the 19th of September in Capelle aan den IJssel in the Netherlands. The program consists of speakers from MRDH, SMRT, Ricardo Rail and 2getthere.

09:30              Welcome
09:45              Introduction by Dennis Mica, 2getthere

10:00              Presentation by Gert de Visser, MRDH
                         ‘Insights in process of selection and introduction’

10:30              Presentation by Jan Scheepers, Ricardo Rail
                        ‘Insights in safety certification’

11:00              Presentation by Mark Ng, SMRT
                        ‘Insights in operations of last mile solutions’ 

11:30              Presentation by Jean-Luc Valk, 2getthere
                        ‘Insights in the 3rd generation GRT system’                   

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Afternoon Program

In the afternoon a reference visit to the ParkShuttle is organized as part of the Podcar Conference, hosted in the city of Antwerp on September 20 and 21. As an introduction the parties involved in the realization will talk about the experiences from their perspective.

13:00              Presentation by Dick van Sluis, Capelle a/d IJssel
                        ‘Lessons learned by the city’

13:20              Presentation by Peter Krumm, Connexxion
                        ‘Lessons learned by the operator’

13:40              Presentation by Carel van Helsdingen, 2getthere
                        ‘Lessons learned by the supplier’

After conclusion of the last presentation we will spilt up into groups of 20 people for an on-site visit to the Rivium application. It is still the only automated system in the world that operates at grade, without stewards and has crossings with other traffic.

Please feel free to share this invitation with your colleagues or other consultants in your network that like to learn more about automated vehicle systems. The conference on the 19th of September is free of charge.

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ATRA webinar: where is automated transportation going next (June 17, 2015)

[quote]Please join the webinar organized by the Advanced Transit Association Industry Group (ATRA IG) on June 17 at 1500 GMT (1000a EDT).[/quote]

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The Webinar is entitled ‘Where is autonomous transit going next?’ and will address where advanced transit systems such as personal rapid transit (PRT) and group rapid transit (GRT) are going. It will cover potential transport demand for ATNs as well as expected technology and strategy developments. The featured speakers represent the University of Bologna and LogistikCentrum. [/one_half]

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The webinar will last approximately 40 minutes after which there will be opportunity to ask questions to the speakers and members of the ATRA Industry Group. There is no need to register; you can access the webinar via the link below. As the room accommodates 100 attendees only, please be sure to join on time! You can participate under your name or an alias if you desire to remain anonymous.

https://webmeeting.umd.edu/atraigwebinar/

This webinar is the third in a series of three webinars. The first two webinars can be viewed on http://www.advancedtransit.org/library/videos/

 

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ATRA Webinar: where are automated transit networks now (May 20, 2015)

[one_half] Date: May 20th at 15.00pm UTC/GMT

The webinar will address where advanced transit systems such as personal rapid transit (PRT) and group rapid transit (GRT) are now. Ranging from the proven applications in operation for several years (Rivium, Masdar City and Heathrow) to the test tracks (Modutram) and the planned applications (Hsinchu City) and technology developments. Featured expert speakers represent 2getthere, Modutram and ULTra PRT.
 
 
 
 
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The webinar will last approximately 40 minutes after which there will be opportunity to ask questions to the speakers and members of the ATRA Industry Group. There is no need to register; you can access the webinar via the link below. As the room accommodates 100 attendees only, please be sure to join on time! You can participate under your name or an alias if you desire to remain anonymous.

webmeeting.umd.edu/atraigwebinar

This webinar is the second in a series of three webinars, with the final webinar scheduled for June 17th: “Where is autonomous transit going next?” The first webinar can be viewed on www.advancedtransit.org/library/videos

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ATRA Webinar: what to plan for when planning for automated transit networks (April 22, 2015)

[quote]What to plan for when planning for Automated Transit Networks
Date: April 22nd at 15.00pm UTC/GMT [/quote]

[one_half] The webinar is to discuss the key aspects of assessing whether advanced transit systems such as personal rapid transit (PRT) and group rapid transit (GRT) are a fit with the application’s requirements and characteristics. Featured expert speakers represent ARUP, Lea+Elliott and PRT Consulting.

The webinar will last approximately 40 minutes after which there will be opportunity to ask questions to the speakers and members of the ATRA Industry Group.

During the session we will be covering topics such as:

  • Where to start with the assessment? What information is required to start evaluating the potential project?
  • What capacity can ATN realistically provide? Can they handle surge loads?
  • What is required in terms of right-of-way? How can they be integrated into an existing urban environment [/one_half]

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You can register for the webinar via the link below. As the room accommodates 100 attendees only, please be sure to join on time! You can participate under your name or an alias if you desire to remain anonymous.

https://webmeeting.umd.edu/atraigwebinar/

This webinar is the first in a series of three webinars.

The other webinars in this series are:

May 20th: ”Where are Automated Transit Networks now?”
June 17th: “Where is autonomous transit going next?”

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ATRA webinar: Public Transport Comple(men)ted (May 29, 2014)

[one_half] As founding member 2getthere would like to invite you to join the webinar organized by the Advanced Transit Association Industry Group (ATRA IG) on May 29th at 15.00hr (UK time).

The webinar is entitled ‘Public Transport Complemented’ and will feature speakers from some of our members including PRT Consulting, ULTra Global PRT and 2getthere providing an introduction to Automated Transit Networks. It will last approximately 40 minutes after which there will be opportunity to ask questions to the speakers and members of the ATRA Industry Group.

During the session we will be covering topics such as:
• What are Automated Transit Networks (ATN)?
• How can it best be used to enhance existing public transportation?
• How current operational systems are performing.

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Please note that there is no requirement to register for the webinar: by simply using the URL below you can request access to the meeting room at the start of the webinar. All you have to do is enter your name, or an alias if you desire to remain anonymous. As the room accommodates 100 attendees only, please be sure to join on time!

URL: https://webmeeting.umd.edu/igatra/

The ATRA Industry Group consists of: 2getthere, Arup, Berger/ABAM, Lea+Elliott, LogistikCentrum, Podaris, PRT Consulting, ULTra Global PRT, University of Bologna

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The start of the autonomous age at Schiphol Airport, 1997



Schiphol GRT

In 1997 four ParkShuttles were installed at Schiphol Airport’s long term parking lot P3, to improve the service to airline-passengers and to support Schiphol’s brand image. Each vehicles accommodated 8 seated passengers, 2 standees and luggage. At any time three ParkShuttles were in operation, while one vehicle is charged. When there are no transit requests, the vehicles space themselves to ensure minimal waiting times at each stop. When necessary the vehicle charging was made available by manual override for additional capacity.

System Operations

The track consisted of two loops of 1 kilometer each, featuring 3 stations per loop. The vehicles transported passengers from the shuttle stops near their cars to the main stop at the passenger lounge. At the passenger lounge berths were provided for alighting and boarding for both loop A and loop B. Each loop had several intersections with car traffic (equipped with barriers and traffic lights) and pedestrians (equipped with audible alarms only). From the passenger lounge buses provided transportation towards the passenger terminals.

Lessons Learned

During the lifespan of the system several surveys showed great passenger satisfaction and the system proved very reliable. The service was available 24/7, free of charge. Operations were stopped in 2004 after 7 years of operation, where the pilot was intended for 3 years only initially. Installation of the 2nd generation ParkShuttle was seriously considered, but uncertainty in regard to future plans of Schiphol Airport and parking lot P3, as well as the development of air-traffic meant a positive decision could not be taken at that time.

Videos

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